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what is the diffrent between fat32 and ntfs for the HDD... I change from Fat32 to NTFS and I notes that my Pc start to be slower..

NTFS supports file access security, encryption, auditing and journaling. Most of these things are not used by home users, although you might want to still keep it because it recovers better from a crash. You might also want to try defragmenting your drive to see if the speed improves.

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what is the diffrent between fat32 and ntfs for the HDD... I change from Fat32 to NTFS and I notes that my Pc start to be slower..

NTFS supports file access security, encryption, auditing and journaling. Most of these things are not used by home users, although you might want to still keep it because it recovers better from a crash. You might also want to try defragmenting your drive to see if the speed improves.

I read in a magazine (forgot which one) that defragin your system doesn't affect your speed in any ways.

 

And i don't think there would be much of a difference in speed between those formats. Just more options like security and larger files.

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I read in a magazine (forgot which one) that defragin your system doesn't affect your speed in any ways.

This is only partially true. Defragging only really affects the effective speed of your hard drive(s), and then only if it is heavily fragmented. However, if your hard drive IS heavily fragmented, maybe because you'd been moving and copying and deleting large files all day, defragging could speed it up considerably, effectively speeding up your entire system because it won't have to wait for the slowed-down hard drive.

 

This is especially true when you're installing new programs which frequently access different files on the hard drive, such as many newer games like Doom 3. If they end up all nice and neat in one spot on the disk, they're likely to run a little smoother.

 

That said, any speed "gained" is really just "recovered." You're not going to be any faster than you would be if you hadn't fragmented your drive in the first place. You're not overclocking or anything.

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why would anyone even use FAT32 anymore, it sucks ass  :D

Well, I still use FAT32 as I am using dual boot windows which is Win98 and WinXP on my PC. It's pretty convenient for me to access files on another drive in the same format. When you are using Win98, you cannot access the other drive which is in NTFS format. A friend told me that using NTFS format would cause some troubles but don't know what he meant by 'trouble'.

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why would anyone even use FAT32 anymore, it sucks ass  :D

Well, I still use FAT32 as I am using dual boot windows which is Win98 and WinXP on my PC. It's pretty convenient for me to access files on another drive in the same format. When you are using Win98, you cannot access the other drive which is in NTFS format. A friend told me that using NTFS format would cause some troubles but don't know what he meant by 'trouble'.

NTFS can be a pain when bare-metal recovering (ie recovering from a self-contained boot disk) from a serious crash/error because the MS boot disks do not recognise NTFS.

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why would anyone even use FAT32 anymore, it sucks ass  ;)

Well, I still use FAT32 as I am using dual boot windows which is Win98 and WinXP on my PC. It's pretty convenient for me to access files on another drive in the same format. When you are using Win98, you cannot access the other drive which is in NTFS format. A friend told me that using NTFS format would cause some troubles but don't know what he meant by 'trouble'.

NTFS can be a pain when bare-metal recovering (ie recovering from a self-contained boot disk) from a serious crash/error because the MS boot disks do not recognise NTFS.

so... fat32 is better :D....as you say

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why would anyone even use FAT32 anymore, it sucks ass  ;)

Well, I still use FAT32 as I am using dual boot windows which is Win98 and WinXP on my PC. It's pretty convenient for me to access files on another drive in the same format. When you are using Win98, you cannot access the other drive which is in NTFS format. A friend told me that using NTFS format would cause some troubles but don't know what he meant by 'trouble'.

NTFS can be a pain when bare-metal recovering (ie recovering from a self-contained boot disk) from a serious crash/error because the MS boot disks do not recognise NTFS.

so... fat32 is better :D....as you say

It really depends on your requirements. I personally use NTFS on my XP box because I have multiple users using that machine. I use a Linux recovery disk which is able to access my NTFS partition so I get the best of worlds.

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