Jump to content

Time for Windows 7!


VT-Vincent
 Share

Recommended Posts

I awoke this morning to find my two Windows 7 keys in my inbox, now I have the fun task of backing up and reinstalling everything. I haven't even installed the OS yet (at least not on real hardware) and I've already found my first annoyance. You can't boot from the CD to do a clean install when you are using an upgrade version - it will refuse to accept the upgrade key. You need to actually launch the installer from an upgrade-eligible OS first. I understand the concept of an upgrade version, but does Microsoft really think no one will be reinstalling at any point? And if they are, doesn't it seem a bit asinine to install and old OS first, just to erase it and install Windows 7?

 

Well, backup has just about finished so it's time to wipe the drive and hope for the best!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 62
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

That does seem pretty stupid. I suppose they're affraid people will go selling their upgrade copies to people who aren't upgrading or something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The dumbest thing of all is they actually left a "back door" method of getting around that check. If you install first without a key, you can then launch the installer inside of 7 and "upgrade" the copy you just installed and it will accept the key and activate without any issues. It's like they did this just to annoy their users.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow. Well the day I change from XP is the day is the day they stop making things work on XP.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oops. I'm sure Microsoft will realise this soon and do something about it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The issue that is coming up is actually related to people trying to unpack the 64-bit media on a 32-bit operating system. The process errors out of the OS you're unpacking on is not 64-bit. I wish they would have distributed it in the form of an ISO, but I didn't have any trouble repacking it into a bootable CD so I'm not too concerned.

 

There's actually no reason to use a pirated disk for the upgrade process, all you have to do is install 7 without a key, then "upgrade" from that installation. This is the same way Vista's upgrade process went. I doubt they will disable it as it's actually Microsoft-sanctioned. It is the only way you can do a clean installation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah but it happens even when you install the 32 bit windows 7 over an existing 32 bit os. (Only on the student upgrade though not other versions) There are 64 bit files in the 32 bit setup screwing everything up for people that aren't going from 64 bit to 32 bit (no one smart) also there are reports of problems later on with rebuilt ISOs. I don't know why there should be any though unless you did something wrong.

 

Anyway yeah your right, there is actually an even easier way here to just get the activator running after you install with no key

 

http://www.downloadsquad.com/2009/10/23/sa...does-full-inst/

 

EDIT: I guess the problem with a rebuilt ISO is you might have installed a 32 bit operating system where some of the files are 64 bit, so if you install 64 bit you should be okay either way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It doesn't make sense that they didn't provide the ISO to begin with. The worst part about it is they actually did the same thing with Vista! Nothing looks worse than botching it on day one. You would think they may have learned that by now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...